Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Profound apraxia at age (nearly) 5

I've been noticing that dd2 talks and sings to herself more these days. A month ago I listened in as we were walking home from the library. She said, “Two peepo in uh cah” (Two people in a car.) I mean, no one other than me probably would have understood the whole thing, but WOW. 5 word phrase? Unheard of!

Today she wanted more of some candy she'd had earlier. She told me, “liddle whi din eat” and then she said “dum”. So, little white thing (to) eat. Gum. I LOVE her workarounds. A skill more vital to a kid with profound apraxia? Can’t think of one! A sign of intelligence, I’m sure we can all agree.

Boo read us two books from the library today. She’s really improving. Nea likes to mumble the words to herself as her sister reads. It’s a little annoying, this small echo as we read along, but I’m not about to tell her to stop trying to say all these new words.

5 comments:

Hilts said...

Funny. My Dad never went to school, but sorta taught himself to read. He knew the sounds of the letters, so when he read - and it was only White Sox recaps, so he knew the context - he would sound every letter and then put it all to-gether.

Miss that whispering of letters - funny what you miss.

Shea's Mom said...

Sweet! Isn't it wonderful when you can hear longer sentance attempts and trying new words.

Yes, they are smart.

They will get there. They just have a different path.

So much has to do with us parents. They are really lucky they have us! And, visa versa, of course.

Thanks for visiting my blog. I will be back!

Kate said...

Teddy often repeats himself, under his breath. Doesn't know he's doing it. I would imagine it's way more annoying than Nea's little habit, who is both brilliant and endlessly cute (not that T isn't, you understand, but still.)

Kate said...

Ooh. Just reread my wee comment, and the grammar is atrocious. I must apologize. It's the sleep deprivation.

Baywatch said...

it's funny the way one develops an ear for their child's version of the language.